How long can a baby on solids go without pooping?

By Johan Peeters, On 27th October 2021, Under Family and Relationship
Infants older than eight weeks often go 4 or 5 days without a dirty diaper, and it doesn't mean they are constipated. Breastfed babies, especially if they have not started solid foods, can easily go two weeks without a poopy diaper once they are 2-3 months old.

In this manner, how do I get my baby to poop after starting solids?

Foods like applesauce, bananas, and cereals are very binding and can cause constipation in babies. Instead, choose more fiber-filled fruit or vegetables to help loosen her stool. Foods like fiber-rich cereals or fruits like prunes, peaches, or pears can help the stool pass through the intestines quicker.

Beside above, how often should I feed my baby when starting solids?

Start to introduce solid foods around 6 months of age (not before 4 months). Your baby will take only small amounts of solid foods at first. Start feeding your baby solids once a day, building to 2 or 3 times a day.

How do you know if baby is constipated after starting solids?

Here are some of the tell-tale signs that your baby is constipated:
  1. After the introduction of solid foods, babies normally have approximately one bowel movement a day.
  2. Unusually long periods of straining or crying while trying to have a bowel movement.
  3. A lack of appetite or refusing to eat.
  4. A hard belly.

What should baby poop look like when starting solids?

Once your baby's eating solid foods, you'll quickly notice a change in his poos, especially if he's breastfed. Solid-food stools tend to be brown or dark brown and thicker than peanut butter but still mushy. They're also smellier. You may notice that your baby's poo takes on the colour of the food you give him.
Your baby's constipation may be a sign of sensitivity to that food. If your baby is constipated, stop feeding your baby that new food and see if their constipation clears up.
What Should I Know About My Infant's Diet? *Baby food low in fiber and high in starches, which may worsen constipation, include carrots, sweet potatoes, squash, bananas, applesauce, and rice cereal. You do not need to avoid these foods, but rather avoid pairing them at a meal.
If you're still concerned or your baby goes a full week without pooping, give your pediatrician a call. Laxatives are rarely used on infants, but your doc might suggest you soak your baby in a warm bath, massage his tummy, or give him a few ounces of water or prune juice, which can all help loosen his stools.
Call your pediatrician if your baby hasn't pooped for more than three days in a row. Formula-fed babies typically go a little longer between bowel movements. Check in with the doctor if she doesn't poop for more than five days as that could be a sign of constipation.
After your baby starts solids, their poop pattern, texture and even color will start to change (looking more like “real” poop). It's also not unusual for babies to have trouble with constipation. To help prevent constipation, try offering sips of water from a cup after each meal when they begin eating solid foods.
Stop serving foods that can cause constipation (potatoes, cheese, bananas, rice cereal, pasta) and start serving purees loaded with fiber. Serve purees with produce starting with 'P' – prunes, peaches, pears, peas and plums. Start to re-introduce purees that are easy to digest, such as avocado and sweet potato purees.
The stool of a constipated baby that is exclusively breastfed will look like little clay balls instead of liquidy, seedy or pasty. Streaks of blood on the outside of the stool. Your baby is arching their back, tightening their buttocks or crying during bowel movements.
Quick ways to make yourself poop
  1. Take a fiber supplement.
  2. Eat a serving of high-fiber food.
  3. Drink a glass of water.
  4. Take a laxative stimulant.
  5. Take an osmotic.
  6. Try a lubricant laxative.
  7. Use a stool softener.
  8. Try an enema.
Apples are known to harden the stool so eating them while suffering from diarrhoea can help. But steamed apples, a popular baby food, can cause constipation in babies. Also avoid giving applesauce to your baby as it contains pectin protein, which hardens the stool.
Here's an easy rule to remember: It's safe to give baby water whenever you start introducing solids, when babies are around 6 months old. They won't take more than a few sips from a cup or bottle at a time—and that's fine, because they don't really need it.
As long as your baby is feeding normally and gaining weight (1 to 2 pounds a month), don't worry about the number of poops. Other babies poop once every few days or even once a week. Even if your baby is pooping less frequently, they should still have a big poop that is soft and easy to pass when they do go.
Unfortunately, some babies don't react well to solids and as a result baby constipation is common. However, constipation does not only occur when babies start solids. Regardless of the cause, constipation causes pain and discomfort, and it's important to know when your baby is constipated so that you can act fast.
Introducing Solids to Your Baby May Cause Constipation
Solid foods require more digestion, so it's normal for babies to have less frequent bowel movements as you introduce solid foods.
6-8 Months:
Formula and/or Breast Milk is still most important at this age and stage. Babies in this range may be just starting solids so the above for 4-6 Months would apply. Some babies may be eating up to 8 ounces of solid foods between 2-3 “meals” during a day.
After starting solids (about a month ago), my baby doesn't want to nurse as much. It's absolutely normal for baby to drink less breast milk if she is eating a significant amount of solid foods. She's simply beginning to move toward a more “grown up” diet.
Given that, bananas are a great option for a first solid food for babies. In fact, bananas are a great food for babies, kids, and adults at all ages and stages: naturally sweet, soft enough to mash with a fork (or gum), and ripe with lots of key nutrients.
When your 4-6 month old baby is learning to use a cup, giving him a few sips of water a couple of times a day (no more than 2 ounces per 24 hours) is fine and fun. Once baby starts solids, you might want to give him a few sips of expressed milk or water with his solids – some babies need this to prevent constipation.
A 6-12 month old baby needs two to eight ounces of water per day on top of the water they get from breast milk/formula. Taking sips from their cups throughout the day will usually get them the water they need.