How long would it take to get from the earth to the sun?

By Thanh Nguyen Tien, On 18th March 2021, Under Science and Education
Explanation: Sun is about 8.3 light minutes from the Earth. This means it would take 8.3 minutes for light to reach from the Surface of the Sun to reach the Earth. If you are traveling in a Jumbo Jet , it would take you about 19 years to reach the Sun.

Considering this, how many Earths can fit in the sun?

one million Earths

Likewise, how far away is the earth from the sun right now?

How far away is the Sun? The Sun is at an average distance of about 93,000,000 miles (150 million kilometers) away from Earth. It is so far away that light from the Sun, traveling at a speed of 186,000 miles (300,000 kilometers) per second, takes about 8 minutes to reach us.

Can we survive without the moon?

The moon influences life as we know it on Earth. It influences our oceans, weather, and the hours in our days. Without the moon, tides would fall, nights would be darker, seasons would change, and the length of our days would alter.

Can we survive without sun?

Instead, they get their food and energy from the heat coming out of these geothermal vents. While most life would be extinguished from our planet without the sun, these geothermal-loving organisms would continue to thrive for billions of years without a single care that the sun no longer existed.
As of its January 29, 2020, perihelion, the Parker Solar Probe's closest approach is 18.7 million kilometres (11.6×106 mi).

Parker Solar Probe.
Names Solar Probe (before 2002) Solar Probe Plus (2010–2017) Parker Solar Probe (since 2017)
Mission type Heliophysics
Spacecraft properties
In theory, we could. But the trip is long — the sun is 93 million miles (about 150 million kilometers) away — and we don't have the technology to safely get astronauts to the sun and back yet. The sun's surface is about 6,000 Kelvin, which is 10,340 degrees Fahrenheit (5,726 degrees Celsius).
So will it ever be possible for us to travel at light speed? Based on our current understanding of physics and the limits of the natural world, the answer, sadly, is no. So, light-speed travel and faster-than-light travel are physical impossibilities, especially for anything with mass, such as spacecraft and humans.
The Sun is about 93 million miles from Earth. As Earth and Mars move in their separate orbits, they never come closer than 35 million miles to each other. Saturn, the most distant planet known when Cassini was alive, is around 900 million miles away.
Distance Information
Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our own, is still 40,208,000,000,000 km away. (Or about 268,770 AU.) When we talk about the distances to the stars, we no longer use the AU, or Astronomical Unit; commonly, the light year is used.
Several thousand galaxies, each consisting of billions of stars, are in this small view. XDF (2012) view: Each light speck is a galaxy, some of which are as old as 13.2 billion years – the observable universe is estimated to contain 200 billion to two trillion galaxies.
There are 6 trillion miles in a light-year (approximately), so the distance we need to go is 6 trillion miles / light-year times 4 light-years, or 24 trillion miles. So, this trip would take 1.2 billion hours. There are 24 hours a day and 365.25 days per year, so this time in years is 137 thousand years.
13.7 billion years
Colonization of the Moon is the proposed establishment of a permanent human community or robotic industries on the Moon. Permanent human habitation on a planetary body other than the Earth is one of science fiction's most prevalent themes.
While we're used to the sun rising and setting each day, the sun itself is incredibly dynamic. And just like us, it goes through phases and changes. Over time, those changes in our star have become more predictable. Currently, it's going through a less active phase, called a solar minimum.
The simple answer is that the Sun is the closest star to Earth, about 93 million miles away, but that might not answer your question. Outside of our Sun, our system's nearest neighbor is Alpha Centauri. This isn't a single star, it's actually a triple-star system — three stars bound together by gravity.
There are 6 trillion miles in a light-year (approximately), so the distance we need to go is 6 trillion miles / light-year times 4 light-years, or 24 trillion miles. So, this trip would take 1.2 billion hours. There are 24 hours a day and 365.25 days per year, so this time in years is 137 thousand years.