What a hurricane looks like?

By Hugo Fagundes, On 28th March 2021, Under Science and Education
It is very calm and clear in the eye, with very low air pressure. Higher pressure air from above flows down into the eye. If you could slice into a tropical cyclone, it would look something like this. The small red arrows show warm, moist air rising from the ocean's surface, and forming clouds in bands around the eye.

Likewise, what happens in the ocean during a hurricane?

Slow-moving fish and turtles and shellfish beds are often decimated by the rough undercurrents and rapid changes in water temperature and salinity wrought by a hurricane. Sharks, whales, and other large animals swiftly move to calmer waters, however, and, generally speaking, are not overly affected by hurricanes.

Furthermore, can you survive a hurricane at sea?

In the teeth of the storm, a ship's survival depends on two things: sea room and steering-way. Cargo ships try to stay well offshore if they must face a major storm at sea. If a ship is on a "lee shore," with land close by downwind, the storm can drive the ship onto the land and wreck it.

What is a hurricane at sea called?

In the Atlantic and northern Pacific, the storms are called "hurricanes," after the Caribbean god of evil, named Hurrican. In the northwestern Pacific, the same powerful storms are called "typhoons." In the southeastern Indian Ocean and southwestern Pacific, they are called "severe tropical cyclones."

How does a hurricane start?

Hurricanes begin as tropical storms over the warm moist waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans near the equator. (Near the Phillippines and the China Sea, hurricanes are called typhoons.) As the moisture evaporates it rises until enormous amounts of heated moist air are twisted high in the atmosphere.
Counting Irma, Florida has now sustained 117 direct hits by hurricanes in recorded history -- far more than any other US state, according to NOAA. That's almost twice as many major storms as have hit the runner-up, Texas. Louisiana is third in hurricane landfalls, followed by North Carolina and South Carolina.
A typical hurricane can dump 6 inches to a foot of rain across a region. The most violent winds and heaviest rains take place in the eye wall, the ring of clouds and thunderstorms closely surrounding the eye. Every second, a large hurricane releases the energy of 10 atomic bombs. Hurricanes can also produce tornadoes.
Hurricane Allen had the Atlantic's most powerful recorded sustained winds. The storm, which formed in 1980, had peak winds of 190 miles per hour and a barometric pressure reading of 899 millibars. (*) The barometric pressure of the Cuba hurricane of 1932 was measured at landfall and not while the storm was at sea.
The Smell of a Hurricane

A Hurricane smells like rain. It can also smell like salt because the floodwater is ocean water and ocean water is salty. If you were hit by a piece of flying debris then you may smell your blood.
The most recognizable feature found within a hurricane is the eye. Skies are often clear above the eye and winds are relatively light. It is actually the calmest section of any hurricane. The eye is so calm because the now strong surface winds that converge towards the center never reach it.
During a Hurricane
  1. Stay indoors and away from windows and glass doors.
  2. Close all interior doors—secure and brace external doors.
  3. Keep curtains and blinds closed.
  4. Take refuge in a small interior room, closet, or hallway on the lowest level.
  5. Lie on the floor under a table or another sturdy object.
NOAA's National Hurricane Center does not control the naming of tropical storms. Instead, there is a strict procedure established by the World Meteorological Organization. For Atlantic hurricanes, there is a list of male and female names which are used on a six-year rotation.
A typical hurricane lasts anywhere from 12 to 24 hours. But a hurricane can sustain itself for as long as a month, as Hurricane John did in 1994.
These hazards include heavy rains, high winds, a storm surge, and even tornadoes. Storm surge pushes seawater on shore during a hurricane, flooding towns near the coast. High winds, storm surge, flooding and tornadoes cause damage to houses and cars that are in the path of a hurricane.
The actual process begins with a cluster of thunderstorms moving across the surface of the ocean. When the surface water is warm, the storm sucks up heat energy from the water, just like a straw sucks up a liquid. This creates moisture in the air. If wind conditions are right, the storm becomes a hurricane.
As a hurricane's winds spiral around and around the storm, they push water into a mound at the storm's center. This mound of water becomes dangerous when the storm reaches land because it causes flooding along the coast. A hurricane will cause more storm surge in areas where the ocean floor slopes gradually.
It was so destructive primarily because levees around New Orleans, Louisiana failed. Levees are water barriers built to prevent flooding (parts of New Orleans have an elevation that is lower than sea level). Very heavy winds also contributed to the damage, but flooding was the most destructive aspect of the hurricane.
Hurricanes (or typhoons) are large storms that form over tropical waters. Hurricanes have wind speeds of 74 mph (119 km/h) to 180+ mph (289+ km/h). Waves can be very large in a hurricane, generating a loud sound underwater that can be heard in the local region.
Each year, on average, 10 tropical storms, of which six become hurricanes, develop over the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, or Gulf of Mexico from June to November. Many of these remain over the ocean; however, about five hurricanes strike the United States coastline every three years.
This is what it looks like after a blizzard has come. A snow blizzard is a storm with high winds, freezing rain, a lot of snow, zero visibility, ice, deep drifts and some sleet. Blizzards can last for several days.
Hurricanes effect people's lives because they can do so much damage. Winds can damage houses, trees, and any outdoor property. If the hurricane doesn't destroy where people live then the major flooding after hurricanes might. When homes are destroyed, people may have to rebuild homes and towns.
10 Steps to Prepare for a Hurricane
  1. Make a plan. If evacuation is necessary, turn off all utilities and follow community disaster preparedness plans.
  2. Secure the exterior.
  3. Install storm shutters.
  4. Check wall hangings and art.
  5. Move your cars.
  6. Power up.
  7. Unplug appliances.
  8. Store important documents.
Hurricanes can generate massive waves, so most sea creatures — including dolphins, whales, and sharks — avoid the rough surface water and swim to calmer seas.
Dolphins Seek Deeper Waters

Since a hurricane's rain bands typically occur several days in advance of the actual hurricane, dolphins have time to take precautions and seek refuge deep in the ocean. Due to their size and intelligence, they are able to swim freely in deep waters and avoid becoming food for predators.
Some ocean-dwelling birds will keep flying in the eye of a storm while a hurricane is at sea, staying there until the storm passes over the coast and they can find refuge on land. Burrowing animals such as some owls and snakes will dig down to escape the storm, staying protected from winds and rains.
Because the westerlies move in the opposite direction from trade winds, the hurricane can reverse direction and move east as it travels north. High pressure systems can also affect the path of storms. In the Atlantic Ocean, the Bermuda High affects the path of hurricanes.
How does a hurricane affect marine life? Larger marine animals such as sharks seem to be barely affected. However, hurricanes have been known to result in large amounts of dead fish, crabs, sea turtles, oysters, etc. due to reduced amounts of dissolved oxygen in the water, rapid salinity changes, and violent surf.
In addition, heavy rain during hurricanes lowers temperatures at the water surface and turbulence mixes layers of seawater normally stratified by temperature and salinity. Hurricanes also create waves five feet or higher and strong currents as deep as 300 feet.
How do tsunamis affect the life of fish and marine animals? Tsunami currents increase strongly in shallow water where weaker corals can be broken by the force of the tsunami. Fish and marine animals are sometimes stranded on the land after they are carried by the currents to shore.
The ocean is deep. Officially anything deeper than just 200 metres is considered the “deep sea”, but the average depth of the entire ocean is about 3.5km and the deepest point – the Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench, in the western Pacific – is a little short of 11km down.
Additionally, animals can sense changes in air and water pressure. In conclusion, it is very unlikely that animals can predict the weather. However, it is certain that they are able to sense signals from the environment way before humans can.
Answer: It depends! Some marine animals probably won't even notice that anything out of the ordinary happened. Others will be killed quickly and painlessly by the force of the tsunami. As this happens, coastal water is forced out to sea, and any marine animals that don't move with it may be stranded out of the water.
Oceanology: Underwater Waves Make Underwater Weather. They know even less about undersea "weather"—the currents, eddies and swift temperature changes that sweep across the ocean bottom like winds and storms on land.