What does Ofgem mean?

By William Dart, On 11th February 2021, Under Shopping and E-commerce
the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets

Likewise, people ask, who is Ofgem accountable to?

Ofgem is an independent regulator, accountable to Parliament, working in the broader context of the energy sector and mostly funded by consumers.

Beside above, is there a free phone number for Ofgem?

If your complaint is not resolved to your satisfaction, you can then contact Ofgem so we can follow up the issue with the site concerned. You can do so by: Email: [email protected]ofgem.gov.uk. Telephone: 020 7901 7295.

Who is the energy watchdog?

an organization responsible for making sure that companies that supply energy obey particular standards and do not act illegally: A report from the official energy watchdog Ofgem revealed that while electricity costs had dropped by 25% in three years, consumers' bills had not fallen.

What is the purpose of Ofgem?

Ofgem is the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets. We are a non-ministerial government department and an independent National Regulatory Authority, recognised by EU Directives. Our role is to protect consumers now and in the future by working to deliver a greener, fairer energy system.
The basics
Ofgem stands for the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets. It's a non-ministerial government department, tasked with regulating and overseeing the companies that operate the UK's gas and electricity networks.
Ofgem is the Office of Gas and Electricity Markets. We are a non-ministerial government department and an independent National Regulatory Authority, recognised by EU Directives. Our role is to protect consumers now and in the future by working to deliver a greener, fairer energy system.
The Gas and Electricity Markets Authority is governed by the Chairman Martin Cave, executive members as well as non-executive members. Jonathan Brearley was appointed Chief Executive of Ofgem from February 2020.
It is authorised by the Prudential Regulation Authority and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and the Prudential Regulation Authority under Financial Services Register number 490565.
What action can we enforce?
  • Enforcing licence conditions.
  • Enforcing competition law.
  • Enforcing consumer protection law.
  • Gas and Electricity Markets Authority (or 'GEMA')
  • Enforcement Decision Panel.
  • Settlement committees.
If your complaint is not resolved to your satisfaction, you can then contact Ofgem so we can follow up the issue with the site concerned. You can do so by: Email: [email protected]ofgem.gov.uk. Telephone: 020 7901 7295.
If you've owed the money to your supplier for more than 28 days, you can't switch supplier until you've paid the money back. You can't be stopped from switching if it's your supplier's fault that you're in debt - for example because they've estimated your bill wrong.
You should contact the comparison site first to raise your complaint and so they can try to resolve it. If your complaint is not resolved to your satisfaction, you can then contact Ofgem so we can follow up the issue with the site concerned. Email: [email protected]ofgem.gov.uk. Telephone: 020 7901 7295.
We're the Energy Ombudsman. We're approved by Ofgem - the UK gas and electricity regulator - to independently handle disputes between consumers and energy suppliers.
In other words, it is the energy regulator. It is an official government regulatory body, like Ofcom or the FCA and, as such, has certain powers and duties. They are governed by the Gas and Electricity Market Authority (GEMA), and are funded by levies on the energy companies it regulates.
  1. Step 1: Complain to your energy supplier. Although you may want to appeal to a higher authority, your first step when something goes wrong should always be to go to your energy supplier directly.
  2. Step 2: Get in touch with Citizens Advice Consumer Service.
  3. Step 3: Contact the Energy Ombudsman.
You must complain to the ombudsman within 12 months of your supplier telling you their decision. If your supplier hasn't given you a decision you might have longer than 12 months, but it's still worth complaining as soon as you can.
Can customers sue power companies for outages? Yes, but it's hard to win. According to Kreppein, there's nothing barring customers — whether they're businesses or individual ratepayers — from bringing such suits against power companies, even though utilities are state-regulated.
Who is my electricity supplier? To find out a property's electricity supplier, contact your regional Distribution Network Operator (DNO), the company that owns and maintains the electricity grid in your area. Phone them and ask for their Meter Point Administration Service (MPAS).