What is the life expectancy of someone with microcephaly?

By Arif Id, On 23rd January 2021, Under Health and Fitness
There is no standard life expectancy for microcephalic babies because outcomes depend on so many factors, and the severity of the condition can range from mild to severe. Babies with mild microcephaly may still meet the same milestones like speaking, sitting and walking as a child without the disorder.

In this regard, can a child with microcephaly be normal?

It is most often present at birth (congenital). Most children with microcephaly also have a small brain and intellectual disability. Some children with small heads have normal intelligence. Microcephaly is a lifelong condition that has no cure.

Also Know, can you detect microcephaly in an ultrasound?

Although microcephaly and intracranial calcifications are typically detected during ultrasounds in the late second and early third trimester of pregnancy, these findings might be detected as early as 18-20 weeks gestation. The optimal time to perform ultrasound screening for fetal microcephaly is not known.

How do you know if your child has microcephaly?

After birth, a baby with microcephaly may have these signs and symptoms: Small head size. Failure to thrive (slow weight gain and growth) High-pitched crying.

Does microcephaly affect intelligence?

Microcephaly is a condition where a baby's head is much smaller than normal. Most children with microcephaly also have a small brain and intellectual disability. Some children with small heads have normal intelligence. Microcephaly may be caused by problems during a woman's pregnancy.
Others will have varying degrees of developmental problems depending on what caused the microcephaly. They may have intellectual disabilities (mental retardation), delayed speech and motor functions, vision and hearing problems, dwarfism or short stature, seizures, or other problems associated with brain abnormalities.
Some children with microcephaly are of normal intelligence and development, even though their heads will always be small for their age and sex. But depending on the cause and severity of the microcephaly, complications may include: Developmental delays, such as in speech and movement.
Early diagnosis of microcephaly can sometimes be made by fetal ultrasound. Ultrasounds have the best diagnosis possibility if they are made at the end of the second trimester, around 28 weeks, or in the third trimester of pregnancy. Often diagnosis is made at birth or at a later stage.
In some cases, microcephaly may be caused by inheriting an abnormal gene. Microcephaly is an autosomal recessive gene disorder. Recessive means that 2 copies of the gene, 1 from each parent, are needed to have the condition. Some genetic disorders that cause microcephaly are X-linked.
Certain complications of pregnancy or delivery can impair oxygen delivery to the fetal brain. Infections passed to the fetus during pregnancy. These include toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus, German measles (rubella), chickenpox (varicella) and Zika virus. Exposure to drugs, alcohol or certain toxic chemicals in the womb.
Microcephaly is a lifelong condition. There is no known cure or standard treatment for microcephaly. These services, known as early intervention , can include speech, occupational, and physical therapies. Sometimes medications also are needed to treat seizures or other symptoms.
Microcephaly is a birth defect in which a baby's head is smaller than expected, compared to babies of the same sex and age. Babies with mild microcephaly often don't have problems other than small head size.
The most common reasons for a baby to be small are the following: The mother smoked cigarettes during pregnancy. The mother drank alcohol during pregnancy. The mother had high blood pressure during pregnancy.
Microcephaly is defined as a head circumference 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the mean for age and sex or roughly less than the 2nd percentile. Conversely, macrocephaly is defined as a head circumference greater than 2 SDs above the mean or greater than the 98th percentile.
Diagnosis. To determine whether your child has microcephaly, your doctor likely will take a thorough prenatal, birth and family history and do a physical exam. He or she will measure the circumference of your child's head, compare it with a growth chart, and remeasure and plot the growth at future visits.
Diagnosing Microcephaly
Microcephaly may be diagnosed during pregnancy with ultrasound. Although microcephaly and intracranial calcifications are typically detected during ultrasounds in the late second and early third trimester of pregnancy, these findings might be detected as early as 18-20 weeks gestation.
Microcephaly most often occurs because the brain does not grow at a normal rate. The growth of the skull is determined by brain growth. Brain growth takes place while a baby is in the womb and during infancy. Conditions that affect brain growth can cause smaller than normal head size.
Microcephaly is a birth defect in which a baby's head is smaller than expected, compared to babies of the same sex and age. Babies with mild microcephaly often don't have problems other than small head size. Microcephaly affects about 2 to 12 in 10,000 babies (less than 1 percent) in the United States.
The prognosis for a child who has microcephaly depends on the other medical conditions the child has. In general, life expectancy for children who have microcephaly is reduced, and the prospects of attaining normal brain function is poor.
Microcephaly may be diagnosed during pregnancy with ultrasound. Although microcephaly and intracranial calcifications are typically detected during ultrasounds in the late second and early third trimester of pregnancy, these findings might be detected as early as 18-20 weeks gestation.
Acquired (also known as progressive) microcephaly is a condition in which a child's head circumference is within the normal range at birth and for an undefined period thereafter but then does not increase as fast as normal and, as a result, crosses percentiles to below the second percentile.
The rate of severe microcephaly was 1.6 percent. The earlier the infection occurred in pregnancy, the greater the risk. Neurologic or eye problems were seen in 12.7 percent of the babies whose mothers were infected during the first trimester.
Recently, microcephaly has usually been misdiagnosed only by ultrasound via measurement of head circumfer- ence (HC). Therefore, the HC in combination with FPL can be used to evaluate the fetal HC and forehead development quickly, and to improve the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosing fetal microcephaly.
You may find out your baby has microcephaly during pregnancy or after he's born. During pregnancy, your health care provider may diagnose microcephaly using ultrasound late in the second trimester or early in the third trimester. After birth, a baby with microcephaly may have these signs and symptoms: Small head size.
Macrocephaly (or "big head") is a very common reason for referral to a pediatric neurosurgeon. Children with macrocephaly have a head circumference (the measurement around the widest part of the head) that is greater than the 98th percentile.