What percentage of the population is left handed and has blue eyes?

By Jerin Raju Mangapally, On 1st February 2021, Under Sports
This is what we know: Approximately 1 to 2% of the world has red hair, so we'll just make that 1.5%. Approximately 8 to 9% of the world has blue eyes, so we'll just make that 8.5%. Approximately 10% of the world is left-handed.

Then, is it rare to be a lefty?

Lefties represent only 10 percent of the world's population, yet they've been such a fascination for so long that study after study has been conducted on what makes them so unique. But while we now know that lefties are normal folks, history wasn't always so kind to our left-handed friends.

Also Know, what are the odds of being a lefty?

In fact, about 1 in 10 people are left-handed, according to the latest research. Also, left-handedness tends to be more common in men than in women. Being a lefty is also a family affair. A Scientific American Mind article states that two-right handed parents have a 9.5 percent chance of having a left-handed child.

Is left handed or ambidextrous more rare?

Yes, it's very rare to be ambidextrous. While 10 percent of the population is left-handed, only about 1 percent are truly able to alternate between both hands.

Why is it rare to be left handed?

A new study suggests lefties are rare because of the balance between cooperation and competition in human evolution. The findings come thanks to some data from the sports world. Representing only 10 percent of the general human population, left-handers have been viewed with suspicion and persecuted across history.
Their brains may organize emotion differently.
A 2012 study published in the journal PLoS ONE found that in left-handers, motivation was associated with greater activity in the right hemisphere of the brain, while the opposite was true of right-handers.
A Scientific American Mind article states that two-right handed parents have a 9.5 percent chance of having a left-handed child. A mixed couple, with one lefty and one righty, have about double those chances. Whereas, two left-handed mates have a 26 percent chance of having a southpaw baby.
Left-handers tend to die, on average, about nine years earlier than right-handers, according to a surprising and controversial new study published today by California and Canadian researchers.
Left-handedness is far less common than right-handedness. Left-handed people are more skillful with their left hands when performing tasks. A completely ambidextrous person is able to do any task equally well with either hand. Those who learn it still tend to favor their originally dominant hand.
And when you meet a red head with blue eyes, you are looking at the rarest colour combination of all for human beings. Around 17 per cent of people have blue eyes, and when combined with 1-2 per cent having red hair, the odds of having both traits are around 0.17 per cent.
Left-handers, who make up 15 percent of the population, don't have a monopoly on memory, though. His own research indicates that 30 seconds of such eye motion can improve episodic memory by up to 50 percent.
Researchers who study human hand preference agree that the side of the preferred hand (right versus left) is produced by biological and, most likely, genetic causes. The D gene is more frequent in the population and is more likely to occur as part of the genetic heritage of an individual.
The handedness of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475–1564), one of the greatest artists of all time, is still controversial. An unfairly unknown autobiogra- phy of Raffaello da Montelupo stated that Michelangelo, a natural left-hander, trained himself from a young age to become right-handed.
People with red hair are more likely to be left-handed.
Recessive traits often happen in pairs so commonly people with the gene for red hair also possess the trait for left-handedness.
Why are left-handers calledsouthpaws”? The “American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language” cites the conventional wisdom that the word “southpaw” originated “from the practice in baseball of arranging the diamond with the batter facing east to avoid the afternoon sun.
Confusingly, there is some crossing of nerves between the body and the brain, which means it's actually the left side of the brain that has more control over the right side of the body and vice versa. In other words, the brain's left hemisphere helps control the operation of the right hand, eye, leg and so on.
Righties rule

The remaining 10 percent are either left-handed or some degree of ambidextrous, though people with "true" ambidexterity—i.e., no dominant hand at all—only make up about 1 percent of the population.
83 % of redheads have Brown eyes, followed by Brown /green hazel then Green/Brown hazel, then brown/blue hazel then grey , green/blue hazel then blue then Green. True Green is (no other colour anywhere)the rarest eye colour. Although Amber is considered rare it is in fact the lightest variant of Brown.
Despite our genetic predispositions, however, many people do change handedness. Mostly, they are forced to switch as a result of injury, Porac says. Changing is somewhat easier for left handers, who already live in a right-handed world and have had to use their non-dominant hand more often.
Like most aspects of human behavior, handedness is a complex trait that appears to be influenced by multiple factors, including genetics, environment, and chance. Although the percentage varies by culture, in Western countries 85 to 90 percent of people are right-handed and 10 to 15 percent of people are left-handed.