Who was Radon discovered by?

By Steven Lineses, On 7th January 2021, Under Home and Garden
Friedrich Ernst Dorn

Moreover, when was radon gas discovered?

1900

Beside above, what is radon used for?

It is chemically inert, but radioactive. Radon decays into radioactive polonium and alpha particles. This emitted radiation made radon useful in cancer therapy. Radon was used in some hospitals to treat tumours by sealing the gas in minute tubes, and implanting these into the tumour, treating the disease in situ.

How was radon discovered in homes?

HOW WAS RADON DISCOVERED: MEASURING AND MITIGATION. As radon is colorless and odorless, the only way you'll know it's in your home is through testing, called measuring. Measuring uses a device to take in samples of the air your family is breathing.

Where is Radon most commonly found?

Radon is present everywhere in the United States. Levels of the gas differ from state to state, but it is particularly high in North Dakota and Iowa.
Possible symptoms include shortness of breath (difficulty breathing), a new or worsening cough, pain or tightness in the chest, hoarseness, or trouble swallowing. If you smoke and you know you've been exposed to high levels of radon, it's very important to quit smoking.
There's no single method that fits all radon removal system needs. Common techniques include: Sub-slab depressurization, where suction pipes are inserted through the floor or concrete slab into the concrete slab below the home. A radon vent fan then draws out the radon gas and releases it into the air outside.
Safe radon levels. The best radon level measurement would be zero. The average global outdoor radon level varies between 5-15 Bq/m3, equal to 0.135-0.405 pCi/L. For every 99.9 Bq/m3, or every 2.7 pCI/L increase in long term radon exposure, lung cancer risk rises 16%4.
Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas and comes from the natural breakdown (radioactive decay) of uranium. It is usually found in igneous rock and soil, but in some cases, well water may also be a source of radon. EXPOSURE: The primary routes of potential human exposure to radon are inhalation and ingestion.
Radon is the number one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers, according to EPA estimates. Overall, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Radon is responsible for about 21,000 lung cancer deaths every year. About 2,900 of these deaths occur among people who have never smoked.
During its decay in the air, radon atoms transmute into radioactive metallic atoms which do not settle but float infinitely. When breathed in, some get trapped in the lining of our lungs, where they continue to decay and radiate.
Pierre Janssen
Per Teodor Cleve
Norman Lockyer
Radon is a radioactive gas and exposure to it causes 21,000 lung cancer deaths per year—only smoking causes more. Because you can't see, smell or taste radon, it's important to periodically test the air in your home.
Today, radon is still primarily obtained through the decay of radium.At normal room temperatures, radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas. When cooled to its solid state, radon glows yellow. The glow becomes orange-red as the temperature is lowered.
Radon gas is colorless, but it exudes a brilliant yellow phosphorescence (light emitted from a substance without perceptible heat) at temperatures below its freezing point. Decades ago, radium salts were mixed into paints to make them glow in the dark.
PRODUCTION: Radon is not produced as a commercial product. Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas and comes from the natural breakdown (radioactive decay) of uranium. It is usually found in igneous rock and soil, but in some cases, well water may also be a source of radon.
As a pure element, iodine is a lustrous purple-black nonmetal that is solid under standard conditions. It sublimes (changes from a solid to a gaseous state while bypassing a liquid form) easily and gives off a purple vapor. Although it is technically a non-metal, it exhibits some metallic qualities.
It's a naturally occurring radioactive gas produced by the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. Because the air pressure inside a house is typically lower than the pressure in the soil around its foundation, radon is drawn into the home through cracks in the foundation and other openings.
The decay products of radon (radon progeny) that are deposited in the lung have relatively short half-lives ranging from less than a millisecond (0.000164 seconds) to about 27 minutes; therefore, they emit radiation for only a short period of time, about three to four hours.
Although colorless at standard temperature and pressure, when cooled below its freezing point of 202 K (−71 °C; −96 °F), radon emits a brilliant radioluminescence that turns from yellow to orange-red as the temperature lowers. Upon condensation, radon glows because of the intense radiation it produces.
A precious, silver-white metal, iridium is hard and brittle, but it becomes ductile and can be worked at a white heat, from 1,200° to 1,500° C (2,200° to 2,700° F). It is one of the densest terrestrial substances. In the massive state the metal is practically insoluble in acids and is not attacked even by aqua regia.