Why is the underground closed?

By Nicole Best Campbell, On 9th January 2021, Under Science and Education
Due to the coronavirus pandemic TfL has significantly reduced services across the London Underground network and has closed dozens of stations and halted the Night Tube. Following a government bailout deal, TfL was asked to increase services and a spokesman said 85% of "normal services" are currently running.

Then, is London Underground closing?

Dozens of London Underground stations are to be closed indefinitely amid a toughening of measures to try to slow the spread of coronavirus. Transport for London (TfL) announced a series of changes late on Wednesday evening as it urged people in the capital not to travel if at all possible.

Additionally, are the tubes running in London today?

Yes, the London Undergound is still running, but with a restricted service. Forty Underground stations that do not sit on intersections of tube lines have already been closed, reducing the service offered, and the Waterloo and City line, primarily used by commuters, has been closed.

Which Tube lines are closed?

Here is the full list of stations that could be closed during the lockdown period:
  • Bakerloo Line. Lambeth North, Regents Park, Warwick Avenue, Kilburn Park, Charing Cross.
  • Central Line.
  • Circle Line.
  • District Line.
  • Jubilee Line.
  • Northern Line.
  • Piccadilly Line.
  • Victoria Line.

What is wrong with the Jubilee Line?

London tube commuters faced major rush-hour delays this morning after a large part of the Jubilee line was suspended. Transport for London (TfL) said the suspension has been caused by an 'unavailability of trains' after a number of faulty ones were removed from service.
Safety on the London Underground. This article is primarily concerned with accidents on the London Underground network, which carries around a billion passengers a year. Statistically, there is just one fatal accident for every 300 million journeys.
The system comprises eleven lines – Bakerloo, Central, Circle, District, Hammersmith & City, Jubilee, Metropolitan, Northern, Piccadilly, Victoria, Waterloo & City – serving 270 stations.
Five Tube lines run a 24-hour service on Fridays and Saturdays: Victoria, Central, Jubilee, Northern and Piccadilly lines. The London Overground operates 24 hours on Fridays and Saturdays between New Cross Gate and Highbury & Islington (not including Whitechapel).
Remember the 'rush hour'
The tube network is very busy during 'rush hour' with commuters moving around the city. You can expect the trains and stations to be overcrowded between 07:30 and 09:30 in the morning and between 17:00 and 19:00 in the evening.
The deepest station is Hampstead on the Northern line, which runs down to 58.5 metres. 15. In Central London the deepest station below street level is also the Northern line. It is the DLR concourse at Bank, which is 41.4 metres below.
“Person taken ill on a train” is self-explanatory. “Customer incident” refers to anything relating to passengers that isn't covered by the above.
How do you build a new underground railway? On 7 January 1869, the first steam train travelled through the Thames Tunnel. Eventually, enough money had been made from tourists visiting the tunnel so it could be developed to transport cargo under the river. This is what the tunnel was originally built for!
A map in 1908 shows eight different coloured lines; the Bakerloo (brown), District (green), Central (blue), Hampstead (purple), City and South (black), Great Northern and City (orange), Metropolitan (red) and Piccadilly (yellow).
Here's a list of London's tube lines with a handy guide to key stops on each route:
  • Bakerloo Line (Brown) FROM: Harrow & Wealdstone.
  • Central Line (Red) FROM: Hillingdon.
  • Circle Line (Yellow)
  • District Line (Green)
  • Hammersmith & City Line (Pink)
  • Jubilee Line (Silver)
  • Metropolitan Line (Purple)
  • Northern Line (Black)
Remember the 'rush hour'
The tube network is very busy during 'rush hour' with commuters moving around the city. You can expect the trains and stations to be overcrowded between 07:30 and 09:30 in the morning and between 17:00 and 19:00 in the evening.
Here is the full list of stations that could be closed during the lockdown period:
  • Bakerloo Line. Lambeth North, Regents Park, Warwick Avenue, Kilburn Park, Charing Cross.
  • Central Line.
  • Circle Line.
  • District Line.
  • Jubilee Line.
  • Northern Line.
  • Piccadilly Line.
  • Victoria Line.
CENTRAL tube timetable overview: Normally starts operating at 05:10 and ends at 23:57.
Transport for London (TfL) is a local government body responsible for the transport system in Greater London, England. TfL has responsibility for London's network of principal road routes, for various rail networks including the London Underground, London Overground, Docklands Light Railway and TfL Rail.
Disused underground stations. Find out more about London's disused Underground stations. There are 270 functioning stations across our network, but at least 40 Overground and Underground stations still in existence are no longer used for travel.
This is a list of the 369 heavy rail passenger stations in and around London, England (330 being within the boundary of Greater London) that are accessible using Transport for London tickets and passes.
There are severe delays on the rest of the Metropolitan Line. London Underground tickets are being accepted on bus routes within the affected areas. Commuters hoping to travel on the affected lines this morning have taken to social media to express their frustration.
London Underground Fares 2020
Zones Travelled Single Journey Ticket Oyster / Contactless Payment Card~
Zone 1 & 2 £4.90 £2.40
Zone 1 to 3 £4.90 £2.80
Zone 1 to 4 £5.90 £2.80
Zone 1 to 5 £5.90 £3.10
The Night Tube. The Night Tube has arrived in London, with a 24-hour service on Fridays and Saturdays. The London Overground operates 24 hours on Fridays and Saturdays between New Cross Gate and Highbury & Islington (not including Whitechapel). Standard off-peak fares apply on the Night Tube.
There is a good service running on all Tube lines one day a year. Transport for London ran a "good service" across the entire Tube network for just one day in the past year. The Standard has learned that the only day that the London Underground operated without delays or suspensions was in May last year.